Comparative Literature

Not a baccalaureate degree program

Comparative literature offers a unique opportunity to study culture and literature in interdisciplinary and international perspectives. By focusing on interpretation, our program prepares students to think independently and work productively in an increasingly diverse and global world. Our courses offer students necessary tools to encounter diverse cultures, navigate different philosophical perspectives, and interpret urgent political issues. We teach enduring works of literature (e.g. Greek tragedy, Dostoyevsky, Woolf, Borges, and Kafka) along with major thinkers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Freud, Nietzsche, Kristeva, Arendt, Foucault, and Derrida, among others. Comparative Literature undergraduate courses are unique because they provide a meeting ground between various disciplines such as literature, philosophy, psychoanalysis, feminism, political theory, ethics, and religion.

The Department of Comparative Literature offers the possibility of a small college's intimate intellectual community amidst a large and diverse university setting. Our classes are small and intensive seminars, focusing on discussion and individualized instruction. Students taking the comparative literature minor find that it provides an indispensable background to almost any major in the College of Arts and Sciences. Because of its rigorous training in analytical and interpretative skills, comparative literature also provides invaluable preparation for graduate school and for careers in law, medicine, psychology, the media, history, sociology, anthropology, and arts management.

Last updated: October 03, 2016 4:01 pm EST